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What is Quality Estate Planning?   

Quality estate planning results from an experienced counseling-oriented attorney carefully listening to your needs, goals and concerns.  Since each client has individual needs, we never attempt to fit you into a “one size fits all” plan.  Your estate plan is designed with your cooperation and your family in mind, because each family is unique.

You want to control your property while you are alive and well, taking care of your loved ones and yourself if you become disabled.  Before or after your death, you want to distribute your property to whomever you want, whenever you want, and however you choose.  You also want to avoid any unnecessary taxes, court costs, or other fees.

The Law Office of Moore & Kerbawy bring you over 50 years of combined legal experience to help you plan, protect, and preserve your wealth and family values.  We will work with you and your other planning professionals as a “TEAM” to meet your planning objectives, for you and your loved ones.

We can show you how to plan for a lifetime, save money, save taxes, save court costs and fees, and get a “superior” estate or business succession plan, all at the lowest “overall” cost to you and your loved ones.

What is “Loving Trust” planning?

It’s more than controlling property and distributing your funds. It’s passing along family values, your heritage, your hopes, aspirations, dreams and your goals for generations to come. 

People have long used Irrevocable Life Insurance Trusts (so-called “Crummey” Trusts), UTMA and UGMA accounts and direct paid State and Federal Tuition programs to help prepare for and pay for educational expenses and as a way to transfer wealth to the next generation. The Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001 (EGTRAA) greatly enhances the use of Section 529 plans and Coverdale Education Savings Accounts (ESAs) as additional strategies to consider in this same vein.

Section 529 College Tuition Plans. 

Get Your Financial Affairs In Order 

By: James L. Moore, Attorney and Counselor at Law; (as published for AARP Modern Maturity Magazine)

For Jeff Rodgers of Grandville, Michigan, this year is a turning point in his life. He has started a new business and has hit the magic age of 40 years old. Naturally, he’s filled with New Year’s resolutions about his health, his life and his finances. He talks a lot about his family, the stock market his retirement plans, and when you ask him what one resolution comes to mind first, he doesn’t hesitate. “I’ve got a lot of different stacks of paper at home and at the shop,” he says, “and for once I would really like to organize everything.”

The Law Office of Moore & Kerbawy bring you over 50 years of combined legal experience to help you plan, protect, and preserve your wealth and family values.  We will work with you and your other planning professionals as a “TEAM” to meet your planning objectives, for you and your loved ones.

Settling an Estate in Trust Centered Planning.

Today it is common practice to use a revocable living trust as the foundation of an estate plan. One of the reasons professionals recommend trusts is so that their clients can avoid the time delays, costs, and publicity of probate. Indeed, a trust that is fully funded (i.e. all assets are under trust control) does avoid probate. However, when some people hear that trusts avoid probate, they assume that means everything happens automatically, and that there is absolutely nothing to do after the death of a loved one.

Handing Over the Family Business.

Many entrepreneurs intend to pass the family business on to future generations of the family. In considering this goal, they must understand two important realities.

Exit planning: Seven steps to success

For business owners, devising a succession plan is crucial in case of disability, retirement, death, or in the event that growth in your company changes your role away from “hands on” to a more managerial focus. Business continuity planning not only benefits the withdrawing owners and their families, but also the remaining owners and their families, the employees, and the business entity itself.